How To Make An Awesome Veggie Burger From Juicer Pulp (Among Other Things)

Easy Vegan Black Bean and Juicer Pulp Veggie Burger Recipe

Easy Vegan Black Bean and Juicer Pulp Veggie Burger Recipe

(Here are links to the first two posts on this subject)

Juicing – Healthy and Great Tasting! – 1/29/2013

What To Do With Juicer Vegetable Pulp – 2/9/13

Note:  The following recipe was created for juicer machine pulp but I think it would be a great recipe on its own with one or two substitutions that are suggested in the recipe – so if you don’t have a juicer – read on.

My veggie burger, juicer pulp journey has taken some interesting turns since last I posted.  I’ve learned a lot about the basics of cooking which,  if you’ve read my other posts on this subject, you’re already aware, that I’ve never been a big fan of cooking or even eating for that matter.  On March 1st I celebrated my one year anniversary of giving up all animal based products in my diet.  I have to admit that over the holidays I did cheat a bit and have some cookies here and there that I’m sure were made with dairy products but that was about it.  I even gave up one of my favorite appetizers, crackers and brie cheese.  I watched everyone else eating it and I was surprisingly satisfied with corn chips with salsa and a few other vegan dishes.

So, to update those who are just joining us, I’d asked for a Jack LaLane juicer for Christmas thinking it would give me a really easy way to get the nutrients I needed without cooking.  Well, this was true to a point but juicer pulp was just not something I’d considered.  I’m not sure what I thought would happen to the remainder of the fruits and vegetables after the juice was extracted  but it turns out that there’s quite a bit of pulp leftover.  My problem was, what I would do with it, as throwing it away or even composting was out of the question.

As of my last post I’d found a somewhat clumsy way of separating the vegetable and fruit pulps, when I discovered, by accident, that veggie pulp tasted pretty horrendous on oatmeal.  Well, I’ve backtracked quite a bit on that idea.  I’m no longer separating anything since the new veggie burger recipe I’ve finally perfected (very subjectively speaking) tastes great with either fruit, vegetable or mixed pulp.  I still use mostly veggie pulp in my humus spread recipe but you can toss just about anything (within the context of juicing, of course) into the veggie burger mix.

My first few veggie burger attempts turned out not so well.  I won’t repeat what my husband said when he tried one.  But through a lot of experimentation and many failures, I think I’ve finally come up with something that’s not too bad!  I actually like them but there are no guarantees to anyone with a finely tuned culinary palate.

So, without further ado…the recipe:

Vegan Black Bean and Juicer Pulp Veggie Burger

Makes about six patties.

4 Tbsp olive oil

1 16oz can black beans – well-drained and about the same volume of fruit &/or veggie juicer pulp.  In lieu of juicer pulp, the same volume of lentils or blended chick peas would work.  You can also experiment with spinach and broccoli or other veggies and fruits chopped finely in a food processor.  This portion of the recipe is a wild card.  Have fun with it!

1/2 medium-sized red onion – minced or chopped

2 tsp parsley (dried or fresh)

1 – 1.5 tsp salt

1.5 tsp chili powder

1.5 tsp garlic powder

1/4 tsp cumin

1/4 tsp turmeric

1/2 cup (approximate) fine bread crumbs or flour

Drain the black beans well and pour into a large mixing bowl.  Use a potato masher to turn the beans to a paste-like consistency but still with some whole or partially intact beans.  Next add the juicer pulp and use a rubber scraper to mix the beans and pulp thoroughly.  Now add the olive oil and remainder of ingredients.  Mix all the ingredients thoroughly.  Begin adding the bread crumbs or flour until you can make a ball with the batter in your hands and no liquid  seeps through your fingers.  Make a patty with the mixture and flatten consistently (be sure it isn’t thicker in the center).  At this point I grill the patties on my George Foreman Grill for about ten minutes but you can fry them in a pan with olive oil.  The latter method is obviously higher in fat if that’s a consideration.  It’s very important that the burgers are grilled thoroughly or the centers will be very mushy and unappetising.  I leave them on until the grill lines are really dark brown but not burned.

I usually make a batch or two and refrigerate them.  I throw them in the microwave at work then add spinach, ketchup, yellow mustard and a little tahini.  Yum!

If any real cooks out there have suggestions for improvement, I welcome them!  Bon Appetit!

Advertisements

Free Pattern, How To Make A Fringed Crochet Choker Necklace

Crochet Necklace With Wood Beads In Turquoise, Blue and Olive Green

Crochet Necklace With Wood Beads In Turquoise, Blue and Olive Green

I’ve made a rule, that before I’m allowed to buy any more yarn, I have to use all that I have, which is quite a lot.  I bought this yarn quite a while ago just because I liked it.  I had no real plan for what I’d do with it since it’s too thick to use for my  headbands.  For my headband pattern, I usually use sock yarn or something equally fine.  This is a flat ribbon yarn made with a polyester, acrylic blend.  I kept thinking what nice fringe it would make.  I designed these necklaces especially with this yarn in mind.This particular yarn is 1/8 inch or 3 mm wide and flat.  You may need to adjust the pattern if a different sized yarn is used.   I chose to use a traditional clasp but a crochet button and loop would probably work well too.

This pattern assumes a basic knowledge of crochet stitches and abbreviations.  My method of crochet is a bit unorthodox due to a problem I had with my left hand when I first learned, so I’m not the right person to give advice to beginners on how to hold the needle and form the stitches.  My post DIY – How to Make A Crochet Headband has a list of stitch abbreviations before the pattern.

If you’re not into DIY projects, or you just don’t have time, you can find these necklaces in my shop Catalina Inspired, in the section Crochet Jewelry.

For this yarn I used a F/5-3.75mm hook.  First, chain 75.  If you’re using ribbon yarn, be sure to keep it flat as you wrap it around the hook.  If it twists, it can look sloppy.

Crochet Choker Step 2 - Add Clasp To End of Chain 75

Crochet Choker Step 2 – Add Clasp To End of Chain 75

If you’re using a traditional metal clasp, at the end of the chain, slide the remaining loop through one half of the clasp as pictured.

Next, chain 1 then sc in each chain stitch making sure the yarn stays flat.  The yarn can get quite twisted so sometimes I cut it making sure I’ve left enough to finish the row.  When you reach the end of the row, slip stitch in the 1st chain stitch, then slip the second half of the clasp over the last loop.   Chain 1.  It should look like this:

Crochet Choker Step 3 - Second Half Of Clasp

Crochet Choker Step 3 – Second Half Of Clasp

Now tie off the last stitch and weave the ends in.

Now cut four 8 1/2 inch lengths of yarn.  Carefully line them up so they are flat and lined up side by side then tie them in an overhand knot around the center of the necklace being very careful to keep the yarn flat and neat.  Carefully tighten the knot until it looks something like this:

Crochet Choker Step 4 - Knot Fringe Around Choker

Crochet Choker Step 4 – Knot Fringe Around Choker

When the knot is tied, lay the eight fringes out flat.  String some wood or glass beads on each length of fringe so they hang down straight and don’t tangle as easily.  I chose to knot the fringes at four different lengths like so:

Crochet Choker Step 5 - Tie Wood (or Glass) Beads To Each Fringe

Crochet Choker Step 5 – Tie Wood (or Glass) Beads To Each Fringe

The finished product should look something like this:Finished!  Crochet Choker Necklace With Wood Beads

Catalina Festival of Art

Me & My Ocean Side Booth at the Catalina Festival of Art

Me & My Ocean Side Booth at the Catalina Festival of Art

I’m finally getting around to writing about the Festival of Art we had here on Catalina Island, September 21, 22 & 23.  It was a beautiful weekend (which is no big surprise here in Southern California) though some complained that it was too hot.  Being originally from the east coast, where this summer it was scorchingly hot and humid, I thought it was perfect.  Not to mention, the nice warm to hot weather we’ve had this summer made the ocean water a refreshing 74 degrees F.  I was actually just swimming at Lover’s Cove Marine Preserve a couple of hours ago with my daughter, Mom & Dad and the water was crystal clear and the perfect temperature!  But, I digress. 

My Original Tile Design on Glass Necklace

My Original Tile Design on Glass Necklace

Some of My Crochet Headbands on Display  (click to see crochet headbands for sale at Catalina Inspired)

Some of My Crochet Headbands on Display (click to see crochet headbands for sale at Catalina Inspired)

I was so honored this year to receive an Honorable Mention for my tile jewelry from the Catalina Art Association!   Awards are given for the categories Fine Painting, Fine Jewelry, Fine Crafts and Photography.  I love the Art Festival each September here on Catalina Island.  I get to see so many islanders and fellow artists who are normally too busy in the summer for socializing (the winter here is another story – there’s plenty of free time). 

My Lotus Flower Notecards Made From Almost 100% Recycled Materials

My Lotus Flower Notecards Made From Almost 100% Recycled Materials

Now that the Art Festival is over, it’s time to enjoy the warm ocean water for a few more weeks before it becomes too cold and meanwhile,  start gearing up for the holidays!

Hope you are having a great day!

A Wave at Lover's Cove Marine Preserve on Catalina Island, California Channel Islands

A Wave at Lover’s Cove Marine Preserve on Catalina Island, California Channel Islands

Summer on Catalina Island

Sunrise View of Avalon Harbor From My Window

Sunrise View of Avalon Harbor From My Window

I love living on Catalina Island but I must admit it can be rather distracting in the Summer.  I’m so lucky to have an amazing view of  Avalon Harbor and the Pacific Ocean right out my living room window.  It provides endless inspiration and beauty and I never tire of seeing it.  However, frequently in the Summer, those waving palm trees beckon me to come out and play.  The coconuty smell of suntan lotion wafts up to my window and it’s all over.  It’s all I can do to keep my mind on whatever I should be doing such as hotel business or projects for my Esty Shop. 

 

My Daughter & I at Lover's Cove on Catalina Island

My Daughter & I at Lover’s Cove on Catalina Island

Yesterday my daughter and I dropped what we were doing and went out to enjoy the Southern California sun.  It’s a slow time of year in the shop which makes for a great excuse when you’re looking for one.  The only problem is that it only fuels the fire.  That warm, clear, sea water sure did feel great!

Easy Crochet Flower Pattern

Easy Crochet Flower Pattern

Easy Crochet Flower Pattern

 This is a simple crochet flower pattern with a twist.  The flower is crocheted around a silver 9mm jump ring.  For this particular flower, I used all six strands of standard, bright pink, embroidery floss.   Jump rings can be found in jewelry supply stores or websites.  I suggest using soldered rings rather than split rings so the thread doesn’t slip through.  The ring I used for this pattern is 9mm in diameter and made with 20 gauge wire.  I’m using a size 4 stainless steel crochet hook.

This crochet flower pattern was designed by me, is copy-righted and free of charge. Please feel free to use this pattern for personal use only. I do sell my crochet items in my Etsy Shop, Catalina Inspired, so I’d appreciate credit for the design and that it not be used for re-sale.

Silver Ring and Pink Embroidery Floss

Silver Ring and Pink Embroidery Floss

The crochet stitch abbreviations I’m using are standard but you can refer to the post – DIY – How to Make a Crochet Headband for abbreviations.

One Single Crochet in the Silver Ring

One Single Crochet in the Silver Ring

To begin, yarn over the crochet hook and do one sc in the ring. Ch 6, sc in ring and repeat around the ring so that you end up with 5 sc in the ring and 5 flower petals. It should look like this:

Round 1 - 5 Flower Petals Made with Ch 6 Spaces

Round 1 – 5 Flower Petals Made with Ch 6 Spaces

   Now, do 9 sc in each ch 6 space. You may need to push the stitches over in order to fit 9. Sl st in the first sc.  It should look something like this: 

  

Round 2 - 9 sc in each ch 6 space.

Round 2 – 9 sc in each ch 6 space.

Round 3 – sl st in next sc. * Hdc in next sc.  Dc in next 2 sc, ch 1, dc in next st, ch 1.  Dc in next 2 sc, hdc in next sc, sl st in next 2 sc.  Repeat from * around the flower.  At the end sl st with first sc and tie off.  It should look like this when finished.  

Finished Bright Pink Crochet Flower

Finished Bright Pink Crochet Flower

 

The final product can be used in jewelry (see the necklace below), or as an applique on headbands, scarves, handbags, sweaters or anything else you can think of. 

Yellow, Gold & Orange Crochet Flower Necklace

Yellow, Gold & Orange Crochet Flower Necklace (click on the picture to see the listing in my Etsy shop)

 

Crochet Headband Pattern – Part 3

Crochet Headband Pattern - In Pale Yellow Bamboo Blend Yarn

Crochet Headband Pattern – In Pale Yellow Bamboo Blend Yarn

 This is the third and final post in a series on how to make the crochet headband pictured.  Here are the two earlier posts:

DYI – How to Make a Crochet Headband – Free Pattern

Crochet Headband Pattern – Part 2  

Please refer to the first post for stitch abbreviations, which are standard.   Also, as I’ve previously written, if you don’t want to make the headband yourself, visit my Etsy Shop, Catalina Inspired where I have many different colors available.

Ok – on to the pattern.  Now that you’ve joined all five squares, the next step is to crochet all the way around twice.   

With the front side facing up, YO and insert the hook into the top right ch3 space and sc 3 times.  Then sc in each sc across the end of the headband till you come to the next ch3 space but skip over the center sc.  There should be 6 sc across the end, not 7.  It should look like this:

Crochet Headband in Salmon Bamboo Blend Yarn - Finish Step 1

Crochet Headband in Salmon Bamboo Blend Yarn – Finish Step 1

 Sc 5 times in the corner ch3 space.  Sc in each sc to the next ch3 space.  If you followed the pattern exactly there should be 7 sc along each square side.  2 sc in ch3 space.  Insert the hook into one of the stitches made to sew the squares together (two layers of yarn), pull up a loop and sc.  2 sc in next ch 3 space.  Here’s what it should look like so far:

Crochet Headband in Salmon Pink Bamboo Blend Yarn - Finish Step 2

Crochet Headband in Salmon Pink Bamboo Blend Yarn – Finish Step 2

Continue with 7 sc, 2 sc in ch 3 space, sc in between squares and 2sc in ch3 space until you get to the next corner.  5 sc in the corner ch 3 space and 6 sc across headband end, skipping over the center stitch which prevents the end from puckering.  5 sc in next corner and continue crocheting the second side, the same as the first.  When you get to the end, sc 2 in the first ch3 space and sl st in first sc.  It should look like this:

Crochet Headband in Salmon Pink Bamboo Blend Yarn - Finish Step 3

Crochet Headband in Salmon Pink Bamboo Blend Yarn – Finish Step 3

 For the next round, sc in each sc all the way around except for at the corners.  See picture for instructions on the corners.

Crochet Headband - Corner Detail Instructions

Crochet Headband – Corner Detail Instructions

 Each corner should look like this when finished:

Crochet Headband - Corner Detail Finished

Crochet Headband – Corner Detail Finished

 Continue all the way around, slip stitch with the first sc and tie off.  It should now look like this:

Crochet Headband - Finish Step 4

Crochet Headband – Finish Step 4

After tying off, yarn over and insert the hook into center sc at right corner.  Ch1.  Sc in each sc across until you reach the center corner sc on the left side.  Ch1, skip 1st sc and sc across to the 1st sc on previous row.  Ch1, skip 1st sc and sc in each sc across to the 1st sc in the previous row.  Continue to decrease stitches until there are 6 sc across.  Now it should look like this:

Crochet Headband - Finish Step 5

Now, after you’ve decreased to 6 stitches, ch 2 then dc across all 6 sc.  Continue making rows of 6 dc until the tie is long enough.  To measure, place the center square of the headband on the top of your head and pull the tie down until it’s long enough to tie a square knot with.  When you think it’s long enough, tie off and repeat the same instructions on the opposite side.  If it turns out that the tie isn’t long enough when you finish,  just add a few more rows until it’s the perfect length.  Then weave in any loose ands and trim.  Here’s the finished product. Crochet Headband in Salmon Pink Bamboo Blend Yarn - Finished!

 I hope these crazy instructions, though a bit unorthodox, were understandable.  If not, please comment on anything you don’t understand and I’ll try to clear up any confusion.  I used a lot of pictures for this pattern, but as I wrote in the first post, I’ve never actually written one of my patterns down.  I found it a bid difficult to communicate something that I’ve done intuitively for so long.  So, again, I apologize if it didn’t make sense.  Happy hooking !

DIY – How to Make a Crochet Headband – Free Pattern

DIY - How to Make a Crochet Headband

DIY – Crochet Headband in “Soft Sunshine” With Bamboo Blend Yarn

I’ve had several people ask about the pattern for crochet headbands I sell in my Etsy shop, Catalina Inspired.  So, by popular demand, the next few posts will provide step by step instructions on how to do just that.   The instructions are for the headband pictured above which is made using Caron Spa Yarn,  a blend of acrylic and sustainable bamboo in “soft sunshine”.  Michael’s craft stores usually carry this yarn.

The instructions for this headband assume a basic knowledge of crochet.   If DIY projects aren’t for you, please feel free to check out my shop where I have many types of crochet headbands available.

Through much experimentation, I’ve found some yarns that work well for making this headband.  The photo below shows my three favorites.

Different Types of Yarn You Can Use to Make a Crochet Headband

Different Types of Yarn You Can Use to Make a Crochet Headband. From L-R, wool mixed color, bamboo blend & cotton.

Crochet Headband in Wool - Creamy White and Teal/Sienna Mix

Crochet Headband in Wool – Creamy White and Teal/Sienna Mix. The yarn is fingering weight and is shown as an example of a headband made using very light weight yarn but is not recommended for this pattern.

From left to right, the yarns pictured are, Patons Kroy Wool Sock yarn in a purple/blue/gray mix, Caron’s bamboo yarn, mentioned above,  in a salmon pink and Patons Grace cotton yarn in sage green.  Each type of yarn requires a different hook size and sometimes, a slight change in the pattern.

I like the cotton and bamboo yarns for Spring and Summer headbands and the wools for winter.  I wear the headbands I make all the time, they tie for a custom fit and stay put on your head.  I like that they don’t slide back like so many headbands do.

The bamboo yarn is the largest size yarn I’ve used successfully.  Anything larger tends to be bulky in my opinion, but you may find you like that look.  I’ve used very light fingering yarn (pictured above) but I don’t recommend it for this particular pattern.

The yarn I’ll be using for this pattern is the Caron bamboo blend in a salmon pink, as pictured above.

This crochet headband pattern was designed by me, is copy-righted and free of charge.  Please feel free to use this pattern for personal use only.  I do sell these headbands in my Etsy Shop, Catalina Inspired,  so I’d appreciate credit for the design and that it not be used for re-sale.

I usually use a smaller hook than is called for on the yarn package.  The headband tends to hold its shape better and the tighter stitches also give the headband a good amount of stretch.

cl st = cluster stitch = yo, insert hook into correct stitch, draw up a loop. Yo and pull hook through 2 loops on hook. Yo, insert hook into same stitch and draw up a loop. Yo, pull hook through 2 loops on hook. Yo and pull through 3 remaining loops on hook.

sc = single crochet

sl st = slip stitch

ch = chain

yo = yarn over

For the purposes of this tutorial, I’ll be using crochet hook size F/4, although I usually use F/3 on the headbands I sell in my shop.  Since it’s harder to see what you’re doing when the stitches are so tight, I recommend using the larger size hook for the first one you make.

Using crochet hook size F/4 and the Caron Bamboo blend yarn previously mentioned, chain 4 and join with the first ch st using a sl st, or use a sliding loop.

Round 1 – ch1, 8 sc in loop, sl st in first sc.  You should have 8 single crochets going around the loop like so:

Beginning Round For Floral Motif Used in the Crochet Headband

Beginning Round For Floral Motif Used in the Crochet Headband

Round 2 – Ch 1, * sc in next sc.  Ch 3, cl st in next sc (instructions above).  Ch 3.  Repeat from * all around the loop.  Sl st to first single crochet.  When finished, there should be 8, ch 3 spaces and it should look like this:

Round 2 of Floral Motif for Crochet Headband

Round 2 of Floral Motif for Crochet Headband

Round 3 – ch 1, 5 sc in next ch 3 space.  5 sc in each ch 3 space on round and sl st to 2nd sc at the beginning of the round .  At the end of this round there should be 8 spaces with 5 sc in each and it should look like this:

Round 3 of Flower Motif for Chrochet Headband

Round 4 of the Floral Motif for the Crochet Headband

Round 4 of the Floral Motif for the Crochet Headband

Round 4 – Ch 1 , sc in next 3 sc.  Skip 1 sc, * ch 3.  Skip next sc.  Sc in next 4 sc.  Skip next sc, sc in the next 4 sc.  Repeat from *, 3 times.  Sl st to 1st sc at the beginning of the round and tie off.  Make 5 squares that look like this:

Connecting the 5 pieces, the next step in making the headband, will be covered in my next post.

Click here for part two of the Crochet Headband pattern.

Happy hooking!!

Spanish Tile Jewelry

My most recent jewelry supply order included some great stone chips.  I really like the look of the stone alternating with silver tube beads.  In the past I used mostly glass seed beads to string the pendants on.  Here are some of my newest experiments. 

Spanish Tile With Red Coral and Silver

Spanish Tile With Red Coral and Silver

The first one is a Barcelona Tile design on glass with shiny resin, red coral chips and silver tube beads.  Click on the picture to see the listing in my shop. 

Spanish Tile With Red Coral and Rectangular, Cream Colored, Stone Beads

Spanish Tile With Red Coral and Rectangular, Cream Colored, Stone Beads

The second necklace pictured is also a ceramic tile design from Barcelona, Spain.  I used coral in this piece as well but the chips are branch shaped and the color is more orange-red than the chips used in the first necklace.  Instead of silver tube beads, I used rectangular tube, cream-colored, translucent stone beads.  

Tile Pendant With Oval Green Stones and Silver

Tile Pendant With Oval Green Stones and Silver

The third pendant is my own tile design on brown translucent glass and also coated with a thick layer of crystal-clear, shiny resin.  Oval shaped green stone beads alternate with silver tubes.

The fourth pendant is a Barcelona tile design in pale blue and white.  The stones are clear quartz.

Spanish Tile Necklace in Pale Blue and White Wtih Clear Quartz and Silver

Spanish Tile Necklace in Pale Blue and White With Clear Quartz and Silver

New Catalina Jewelry Finally Finished!

I received the shipment of jewelry-making supplies I’d ordered and regardless of my other priorities, I just had to dig right in.  It’s like Christmas morning. 

Casino Building, Avalon, Catalina Island by Kristy Throndson

Casino Building, Avalon, Catalina Island by Kristy Throndson

I’ve been making Catalina themed jewelry based on my artwork for some time.  I’ve made pendants using miniature reproductions of a watercolor painting mounted on shell but I’ve been longing to create something new.

Catalina Island, Casino Building, Avalon, by Kristy Throndson

Catalina Island, Casino Building, Avalon, by Kristy Throndson

The new pendants I just finished use the same watercolor painting but mounted on silver this time. 

This is mounted using the same method as the original pendants.  The painting is printed on photo paper, cut to size, then encased in a thick layer of crystal-clear, shiny resin. 

The newer version is quite a bit smaller than the shell-mounted pendant at only 3/4″ x 5/8″ but I’ve had people ask for a smaller pendant.  It’s a bit small for my personal taste but I decided to give it a go.  I may try hanging the pendant on silver chain (the pendant in the picture is hanging on cotton cord).  I only wish precious metals weren’t so expensive right now.

Spring Cleaning

I just ordered a ton of new jewelry making supplies in anticipation of summer here on Catalina Island and our Catalina Festival of Art in September.  As a result I figured I should mark down some items in my shop to make way for the new.

Hand Made Crochet Choker Necklace in Ivory with Teal Beads

Hand Made Crochet Choker Necklace in Ivory with Teal Beads

Spring Cleaning Sale at Catalina Inspired on Etsy

I’ll be adding more sale items in the upcoming days and after that, some of the new stuff I’m working on including some Catalina themed jewelry in gold and silver.